TWAIL Coordinates

Also available in Spanish and Portuguese translation

Street in San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1941. FSA-Office of War Information Collection. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., USA.1

Third World Approaches to International Law, best known by its acronym TWAIL, is a dynamic, intentionally open-ended and decentralised network of international law scholars who think about and with the Third World. Within the universe of TWAIL, the ‘Third World’ refers to that expansive and usually subordinated socio-political geography that, during the mid-twentieth century, came to be seen as ‘non-aligned’ – belonging neither to the ‘free’ nor to the ‘communist’ world. Today the Third World is more often referred to, however, as the ‘developing world’, the ‘post-colonial world’, or the (Global) South. In our intensely unequal, racialised, gendered, environmentally precarious global order, confronting a proliferation of Souths in the North and Norths in the South, this socio-political geography can perhaps be better characterised as ‘most of the world’.

A TWAIL Spring

The rubric of TWAIL was born in spring 1996, when a group of Harvard Law School graduate students came together to discuss, as James Gathii has written, ‘whether it was feasible to have a third world approach to international law and what the main concerns of such an approach might be.’ That initial set of discussions, and the conversations that quickly followed from them, included students and scholars from various parts of the Third World and fellow travellers from the North.

The first TWAIL meeting was held in March 1997 at Harvard University. The primary objective – one that has marked the work of TWAILers since then – was to cross-examine international law’s assumed neutrality and universality in light of its longstanding association with imperialism, both historical and ongoing. A parallel purpose was to delineate new emancipatory agendas – new decolonisation agendas – for a rapidly globalizing world. As B.S. Chimni later put it in his TWAIL Manifesto, ‘the threat of recolonisation’ has continued to haunt the Third World. Facing this reality, a new set of tools had to be developed to ‘address the material and ethical concerns of third world peoples.’

In their commitment to interrogating the relationship between international law and the conditions of the Third World, this initial group of TWAILers were clear about the importance of honouring an already well-established lineage of international lawyers, political actors, and intellectuals from the South who had long grappled with the vicissitudes and complexities of the international legal order. In particular, they had in mind those whose roles during the decolonisation period were critical for bringing about the end of ‘formal’ imperialism.

To make sense of this long South-oriented international law tradition, Antony Anghie and Chimni coined the terms ‘TWAIL I’ and ‘TWAIL II’: the former to refer to the scholarship produced by that first generation of post-colonial international legal actors; the latter to scholarship that ‘has broadly followed the TWAIL I tradition and elaborated upon it, while, inevitably, departing from it in significant ways.’

In charting this retrospective chronology, Anghie and Chimni stressed the commitment to intergenerational training and learning that has been so fundamental to TWAIL. At the same time, they were able to highlight the pioneering work of contemporary TWAIL (II) scholars in questioning the conditions of the South from a more global and intersectional perspective. The job of TWAIL I was to wrestle with formal imperialism at home. Our struggle – the struggle of TWAILers II, III, IV and beyond – is to deal with the vestiges of ‘formal’ empire and expanding multi-dimensional forms of ‘informal imperialism’.2

The World of TWAIL

In the years since this initial set of conversations, TWAIL scholarship has grown enormously in terms of both the themes and the geographical and historical scope of the research conducted by its members.

Revising the general theory of international law and unveiling its global history; questioning the functioning of the international order and the role of international lawyers within it; re-theorising the state and revising current discourses of constitutional order, security and transitional justice; cross-examining the fields of international human rights law, international economic law, international environmental law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law; highlighting the importance of social movements, Indigenous peoples, and migrants in the international order – all these and many other topics have come to the attention of TWAIL scholars in recent years.3 Attention to the cross-operation of race, gender, and class, as well as studying past and present forms of decolonisation and resistance have marked this work throughout.4

That first TWAIL meeting in 1997 also inaugurated a line of international conferences that have served as meeting points at which to share research outcomes, consolidate old and new friendships, and assess the prospects for reforming international law’s pedagogy and practice. They have taken place at Osgoode Hall Law School (2001), Albany Law School (2007), the University of British Columbia (2008), Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (2010), Oregon Law School (2011), the American University in Cairo (2015), the University of Colombo (2017), and, most recently, at the National University of Singapore (2018).

Today, 20+ years after the first TWAIL meeting, TWAIL occupies a central place in debates about the past and present of the international legal order. Indeed, it is no overestimation to say that TWAIL’s insights and the work produced under its banner have altered profoundly settled teleological conceptualisations of international law as being innately progressive and always on the side of social, economic, and environmental justice. Most of all, Eurocentric accounts of international law can no longer run unchecked thanks to the work of TWAILers.

TWAILers, fellow travellers, and a new generation of students and practitioners of international law now have a large and growing body of literature behind them that can be mobilised to question those global asymmetries of power that have long accompanied – that have not been external to – international law. Thanks to TWAIL, they can also point at those other uses of international law and at those other worlds that the South and its friends have aimed to put into practice all along.5

TWAIL at the ICJ

A recent confirmation of TWAIL’s growing impact on international law came in the form of Judge Cançado Trindade’s reference to the the edited volume Bandung, Global History and International Law (CUP 2017) in his Separate Opinion to the International Court of Justice (ICJ)’s recent Chagos Advisory Opinion. Debates about self-determination and its role in the modern international legal order had, of course, previously been the subject of detailed and insightful judgments by several jurists from the Third World – some of those TWAIL I figures identified by Anghie and Chimni – such as Mohammed Bedjaoui, Christopher Weeramantry and Fouad Ammoun.

The Bandung volume brought together more than 40 scholars associated with TWAIL and close colleagues to reflect critically on the 60th anniversary of the Bandung Conference. Held in 1955 in Bandung, Indonesia with the participation of 29 African and Asian countries, the Bandung Conference condemned ‘colonialism in all its manifestations’ as ‘an evil which should speedily be brought to an end’. The Bandung collection was cited by Judge Trindade precisely to stress the continued relevance of this call to our supposedly post-colonial global legal order. Almost unanimously, the ICJ found that the Chagos Islands had to be returned to Mauritius ‘as rapidly as possible’ by the United Kingdom, one of its former colonial masters. According to the ICJ, the 1968 decolonisation of Mauritius had not been lawfully completed.6

As the Chagos Advisory Opinion demonstrates, and as the Bandung volume insists, colonialism has not gone away. It is still very much part of the international order, yet mutating into new forms each day. In this regard, TWAIL’s re-entrance into the chambers of the ICJ speaks strongly of TWAIL’s ongoing relevance even in the context of the ‘world court’, international law’s central institution. Given TWAIL’s insights into international law’s original and ongoing implication in the imperial arrangements that are continually being redeployed around us, however, clearly its work cannot be confined to the courtroom. Academic and activist work, interrupting the global legal and institutional order whenever possible, are always part and parcel of any TWAIL praxis.

Five TWAIL Coordinates

In the last part of this express tour of TWAIL, let me outline five ‘coordinates’ that characterise this shared body of thought and practice. I use the term ‘coordinates’ rather than ‘principles’ because TWAIL scholars have been reticent to describe their work according to a set of static or pre-packaged features, or to coalesce around a strict canon or institutional formation. Instead, energies have focused on keeping TWAIL open to new generations of scholars and activists, to new conceptual and methodological innovations, and, in particular, to the exploration of new ways of creating solidarity in our always challenging international order.

  1. History Matters

One approach that brings TWAILers together is an appreciation of history and historiography.7 TWAIL scholarship often takes several steps back from the present to gain an understanding of how international norms and institutional practices have emerged and developed through specific historical conjunctures. The ‘discovery’ of the ‘Americas’; the expansion of European imperialism over Asia and Africa; the two World Wars; the ‘mandates’ and ‘trusteeship’ systems; the decolonisation moment; the oil and debt crises of the 1970s; the eruption of neoliberalism in the 1980s and 1990s, and the long ‘war on terror’ are only some of these conjunctures – together with non-European imperialisms (from the Chinese Empire to the Republic of Liberia) and countless moments of post-colonial violence by post-colonial states.8

Paying attention to these varied histories has allowed TWAILers to trace the co-constitution of international law and imperialism, and more generally to challenge international law’s complacent linearity and unidimensionality by showing the skewed power dynamics that criss-cross the international legal order. At the same time, questioning the assumed history of international law has allowed TWAILers to excavate alternative international normative projects and movements that have had a South orientation: from Bandung, as mentioned above, to the right of peoples and nations to permanent sovereignty over their natural wealth and resources, to the Non-Aligned Movement, to the New International Economic Order, to La Vía Campesina.9

  1. Empire Moves

With one eye on the longue dureé of the ‘international community’ and the other on the impact of its structures and institutions on Southern peoples and environments, TWAILers have been forced to develop a dynamic account of imperialism. For them, as for Marxist historians, ‘[m]en make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past.’10

Imperialism from a TWAIL perspective is, then, not a ‘historical’ phenomenon that can be cordoned off somewhere in the past. Imperialism consists, instead, of a multifarious set of asymmetrical arrangements and forms of conditional integration that have travelled across time and space, and through many scales and sites of governance – from the international to the national and the local; from the public to the private; from the ideological to the material; from the human to the non-human, and beyond. These constraining and detrimental forms of ordering make and remake our surroundings – and indeed ourselves – on a daily basis.11

  1. The South Moves

If empire moves, the South moves too. The categories of South and North are used in TWAIL scholarship not as hard markers of differentiation, but to analyse the evolution – and the continuities and discontinuities – of global economic, political, and legal relations. These include the causes and effects of international migration and asylum patterns; questions of Indigenous sovereignty across the world; and the impact of the IMF, the World Bank, and other powerful international institutions on poverty and inequality within and between states as different as Greece and Indonesia.12

In TWAIL-oriented work, the categories of Global South and North are thus understood not as fixed realities but rather as dynamic frameworks which must be applied and reconfigured in response to local specificities, regional trends, and larger changes to the global economic and political system. Today, this is more pertinent than ever as we face a deepening of inequality between and within states and regions – an inequality which, paradoxically, only goes to underscore our interconnected responsibilities as the inhabitants of this, our anthropocenic planet. ‘Most of the world’ is again a pretty good description of where the heart of TWAIL lies.

It is, therefore, not only in relation to the imperial character of international law that TWAIL scholarship has been pioneering and original. Over the last two decades, TWAIL scholars have argued that human rights law is very limited in what it can achieve to negate the effects of neoliberalism.13 They have also argued that orthodox developmental policies and investment frameworks are structurally biased. This scholarship, which has been always global in its focus, is now proving prophetic as these same concerns are clearly emerging in Northern locations and mainstream scholarship is arriving at similar conclusions.

  1. The Struggle is Multiple

If imperialism is not a matter of the past, and if empire moves just as the South moves, then it follows that the struggle in which TWAIL is engaged is one fought on multiple fronts and on a diverse and shifting terrain.

At the most general level, TWAIL’s struggle is about clearing the historical record concerning the relationship between international law and imperialism past and present. At a more specific level, it involves identifying those key moments in which imperialism has become a constitutive element of the international legal order, and those particular sites in which international law has been the fulcrum of empire. Taken together, TWAIL’s agenda is directed at examining and altering legal understandings, and redeploying law in a more progressive way; which means in a way attentive to progressive political and political economic practices and horizons. As an intellectual project, TWAIL is also concerned as much as with scholarly innovation as it is with due acknowledgment of the important scholarship done by TWAIL scholars and others.

  1. The Struggle is Here

Given this broad agenda of research and political action, TWAILers have insisted on the importance of attending, as feminist scholars have shown us, as much to the personal as to the political. This is crucial given the agonistic nature of states and citizens in the Global South. Emblems – often – of independent life after colonial rule, many have themselves taken on the oppressive, xenophobic characteristics of that from which they fled. Trapped, whether willingly or unwillingly, in cycles of destructive production and consumption; complicit in the radical securitisation of everyday life; deaf to the protests of still-colonised Indigenous groups and minorities, the legacy of imperialism lives on in an active as much as a passive sense in many Third World states.14 For TWAIL scholars, therefore, the struggle remains, and must remain, always there, and always here. It is, and must always be, about present ‘tactics’, and about a longer ‘strategy’.15

Two lines to conclude. TWAIL is a movement, not a school; a network, not an institution; a sensibility, not a doctrine. This restlessness and commitment to openness are nourished, above all, by the diversity of the world to which TWAIL responds and from which its momentum arises.

———

I must thank Jenifer Evans for her editorial support and Antony Anghie, Rob Knox, Vasuki Nesiah, Sundhya Pahuja, Rose Parfitt, and John Reynolds for their close reading of early versions of this blog post. I would also like to thank the blog International Law Under Construction for their initial invitation to write this overview of TWAIL and for permitting it to be republished by Critical Legal Thinking.

Luis Eslava is Senior Lecturer in Law & Co-Director Center for Critical International Law (CeCIL) at the University of Kent

+ Spanish

Coordenadas TWAIL

Luis Eslava

Daniel Rivas-Ramírez (traductor)

Photo: Calle en San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1941. FSA-Office of War Information Collection, Biblioteca del Congreso, Washington, D.C., Estados Unidos.[1]

Los académicos asociados a las ‘Aproximaciones del Tercer Mundo al Derecho Internacional’, mejor conocidas por sus siglas (en inglés) TWAIL (Third World Approaches to International Law), conforman una red dinámica, descentralizada e intencionalmente abierta que piensan el derecho internacional desde y con el tercer mundo.

En el universo de TWAIL el ‘Tercer Mundo’ se refiere a la gran geografía socio-política y usualmente subordinada que durante mediados del siglo veinte fue entendida como ‘no alineada’ (es decir, que no pertenecía ni al mundo ‘libre’ ni al ‘comunista’). Hoy cuando hablamos del Tercer Mundo, sin embargo, hacemos referencia al ‘mundo en vía de desarrollo’, al ‘mundo post-colonial’ o al Sur (Global). En nuestro orden global intensamente inequitativo, racializado, discriminatorio por razones de género y ambientalmente precario, y dónde confrontamos diariamente la proliferación de Sures en el Norte y de Nortes en el Sur, esta geografía socio-política tal vez puede ser mejor caracterizada como ‘la mayoría del mundo’.

Una primavera TWAIL

La rúbrica de TWAIL nació en la primavera de 1996 cuando un grupo de estudiantes de posgrado de la Escuela de Derecho de la Universidad de Harvard se reunieron para discutir, tal y como James Gathii lo ha dicho, ‘si era posible tener una aproximación del Tercer Mundo al derecho internacional y cuáles podrían ser las principales preocupaciones de tal aproximación’. Estas primeras discusiones, y las conversaciones que se derivaron rápidamente de ellas, incluyeron estudiantes y académicos de varios lugares del Tercer Mundo, así como también colegas del Norte.

La primera reunión como tal de TWAIL fue realizada en marzo de 1997 en la Universidad de Harvard. El objetivo principal (uno que ha caracterizado el trabajo de los TWAILers desde ese entonces) fue el de cuestionar la presunta neutralidad y universalidad del derecho internacional a la luz de su larga asociación, tanto histórica como actual, con el imperialismo. Un propósito adicional fue el de delinear nuevas agendas emancipadoras (nuevas agendas de descolonización) para un mundo en rápida globalización. Así como B. S. Chimni lo señaló en su Manifiesto TWAIL, ‘la amenaza de la recolonización’ seguía y sigue rondando al Sur Global. Frente a esta realidad, un nuevo aparato teórico y conceptual tenía que ser desarrollado para ‘responder a las preocupaciones materiales y éticas de los pueblos del tercer mundo’.

En su compromiso por cuestionar la relación entre el derecho internacional y las condiciones del Tercer Mundo, este grupo inicial de TWAILers fue claro sobre la importancia de honrar un linaje ya establecido de abogados internacionalistas, actores políticos e intelectuales del Sur quienes por largo tiempo ya habían lidiado con las vicisitudes y las complejidades del orden jurídico internacional. Ellos tenían en mente, en particular, esos abogados, actores políticos e intelectuales que fueron críticos para dar fin al imperialismo ‘formal’ durante el periodo de la descolonización.

Para comprender esta larga tradición orientada hacia el Sur en el derecho internacional, Antony Anghie y Chimni acuñaron los términos ‘TWAIL I’ y ‘TWAIL II’: el primero para referirse a la investigación realizada por la primera generación de actores jurídicos internacionales durante el periodo de la descolonización ; y el segundo para identificar la investigación que ‘ha seguido ampliamente la tradición de TWAIL I y que se ha consolidado a partir de ella, mientras que inevitablemente se ha apartado esta línea de trabajo en cuestiones significativas’.

Al trazar esta cronología de una manera retrospectiva, Anghie y Chimni destacaron el compromiso con la enseñanza y el aprendizaje intergeneracional que han sido fundamentales para TWAIL. Al mismo tiempo también resaltaron el trabajo innovador que han adelantado los académicos contemporáneos asociados a TWAIL (II) al preguntarse por las condiciones del Sur desde una perspectiva más global e interseccional. El trabajo de TWAIL I fue luchar contra el imperialismo formal en sus hogares. Nuestra lucha (la lucha de los TWAILers II, III, IV y de los que estén por venir) es lidiar con los vestigios del imperio ‘formal’ y la expansión de formas multidimensionales de ‘imperialismo informal’.[2]

El mundo de TWAIL

En los años que han pasado desde estas discusiones iniciales, el trabajo de TWAIL ha crecido enormemente tanto en términos de temas, como en el alcance geográfico e histórico de la investigación desarrollada por sus miembros.

Revisar la teoría general del derecho internacional y develar su historia global; cuestionar el funcionamiento del orden internacional y el papel de los abogados internacionales en él; re-teorizar el Estado y revisar los discursos actuales sobre el orden constitucional, la seguridad y la justicia transicional; cuestionar los campos del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos, el derecho internacional económico, el derecho internacional del medio ambiente, el derecho internacional humanitario y el derecho penal internacional; resaltar la importancia de los movimientos sociales, los pueblos indígenas y los migrantes en el orden internacional – estos y muchos otros temas han llamado la atención de los académicos TWAIL en los últimos años.[3] Atención a la importancia de los temas raciales, el género y las diferencias de clase, al igual que el estudio de las formas pasadas y actuales de de(s)colonización y resistencia, han caracterizado continuamente este trabajo.[4]

La primera reunión de TWAIL en 1997 también inauguró una línea de conferencias internacionales que sirven como puntos de encuentro en los que se comparten resultados de investigación, se consolidan viejas y nuevas amistades, y se examinan diferentes opciones para reformar la pedagogía y la práctica del derecho internacional. Estas conferencias han tenido lugar en Osgoode Hall Law School (2001), Albany Law School (2007), University of British Columbia (2008), Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (2010), Oregon Law School (2011), American University in Cairo (2015), University of Colombo (2017), y más recientemente en la National University of Singapore (2018).

Hoy, más de veinte años después de su primera reunión, TWAIL ocupa un lugar central en las discusiones sobre el pasado y el presente del orden jurídico internacional. En efecto, no es una sobrestimación decir que las ideas de TWAIL y el trabajo que ha sido realizado bajo este rótulo han alterado sustancialmente las conceptualizaciones teleológicas del derecho internacional, las cuales entienden al mismo como innatamente progresista y siempre del lado de la justicia social, económica y ambiental. Si esto no fuera poco, las lecturas eurocéntricas del derecho internacional ya no pueden pasar desapercibidas gracias al trabajo realizado por académicos asociados al movimiento TWAIL.

Los TWAILers, sus colegas y una nueva generación de estudiantes y practicantes del derecho internacional ahora cuentan con un cuerpo robusto y creciente de literatura que puede ser utilizada para cuestionar esas asimetrías globales de poder que siempre han acompañado (y que no son externas) al derecho internacional. Gracias a TWAIL hoy también es posible señalar aquellos otros usos del derecho internacional y esos otras mundos que el Sur y sus amigos han intentado poner en práctica desde hace mucho tiempo.[5]

TWAIL en la CIJ

Un hecho que ha confirmado el impacto que TWAIL ha tenido en el derecho internacional es la referencia que el Juez Cançado Trindade realizó del libro colectivo Bandung, Global History and International Law (CUP 2017) en su Opinión Separada que hace parte de la reciente Opinión Consultiva de la Corte Internacional de Justicia (CIJ) sobre el Archipiélago de Chagos. En esta Opinión Consultiva la CIJ se pronunció sobre el principio de auto-determinación y el papel que desempeña en el orden jurídico contemporáneo. El principio de auto-determinación había ya sido, por supuesto, objeto de análisis detallados y sentencias de juristas del Tercer Mundo (algunas de los cuales corresponden a las figuras de TWAIL I identificadas por Anghie y Chimni), como Mohammed Bedjaoui, Christopher Weermantry y Fouad Ammoun.

La libro colectivo sobre Bandung reúne más de cuarenta académicos asociados a TWAIL y colegas cercanos, los cuales se unieron para reflexionar críticamente sobre la Conferencia de Bandung en el marco de su sexagésimo aniversario. La Conferencia de Bandung se llevó a cabo en 1955 en Bandung, Indonesia en donde, con la participación de 29 países africanos y asiáticos se condenó ‘el colonialismo en todas sus manifestaciones’ como ‘un mal que se debería terminar rápidamente’. La colección de Bandung fue citada por el juez Trindade precisamente para destacar la relevancia que continúa teniendo este llamado a terminar el colonialismo en un orden global que supuestamente ya es ‘pos-colonial’. Casi de manera unánime la CIJ declaró que el Reino Unido debe devolver el Archipiélago de Chagos a Mauricio – uno de sus antiguos colonizadores – ‘lo más pronto posible’. De acuerdo con la CIJ, la descolonización de Mauricio en 1968 no fue completa y de acuerdo al derecho.[6]

Como la Opinión Consultiva de Chagos lo demuestra y como el libro Bandung insiste, el colonialismo aún no ha desaparecido. El colonialismo continua siendo, en gran medida, parte del orden internacional; mutando cada día en nuevas formas de operación. En este sentido, el retorno de TWAIL a la sala de audiencias de la CIJ dice mucho sobre la relevancia actual de TWAIL como tal, en particular en el contexto de la ‘corte mundial’, quizás la institución más importante del derecho internacional. Sin embargo, el mismo trabajo de los TWAILers sobre la manera mediante la cual el derecho internacional se encuentra ligado a procesos imperiales, pasados y presentes, y como estos se despliegan y condicionan nuestra existencia y nuestros alrededores, nos dice claramente que TWAIL no puede restringirse a las sala de audiencias. Tanto el trabajo de académicos, como el trabajo de activistas y actores jurídicos asociados a TWAIL debe interrumpir de manera combinada el orden legal e institucional global cuando sea posible. Esta mezcla de academia y acción son parte integral de la praxis que acompaña  TWAIL.

Cinco coordenadas TWAIL

En la última parte de este recorrido exprés por TWAIL, me gustaría resaltar cinco ‘coordenadas’ que caracterizan este cuerpo compartido de ideas y de prácticas. Uso el término ‘coordenadas’ en lugar de ‘principios’ porque los académicos de TWAIL han sido reticentes en describir su trabajo de acuerdo a un conjunto de características estáticas y pre-establecidas, o a apegarse a un canon estricto o a organizarse institucionalmente. En lugar de ello, su energía se ha concentrado en mantener TWAIL abierto a nuevas generaciones de académicos y activistas, a innovaciones conceptuales y metodológicas, y en particular, a explorar nuevas formas de crear solidaridad en nuestro siempre desafiante orden internacional.

  1. La historia importa

Una aproximación que une a los TWAILers es la apreciaciación de la historia y la historiografía.[7] El trabajo de TWAIL suele tomar distancia del presente para lograr comprender cómo las normas y las prácticas institucionales internacionales han surgido y se han desarrollado a través de coyunturas históricas específicas. El ‘descubrimiento’ de las ‘Américas’; la expansión del imperialismo europeo en Asia y África; las dos guerras mundiales; los sistemas de ‘mandato’ y de ‘administración fiduciaria’; el momento de la descolonización; las crisis del petróleo y de la deuda en los setentas; la irrupción del neoliberalismo en los ochentas y los noventas, y la prolongada ‘guerra del terror’ son solo algunas de estas coyunturas; junto con los imperialismos no europeos (desde el Imperio Chino hasta la República de Liberia) y los incontables momentos de violencia pos-colonial perpetuada por los mismos Estados pos-coloniales.[8]

Prestar atención a estos diferentes momentos históricos le ha permitido a los TWAILers rastrear la co-constitución del derecho internacional y el imperialismo, y en términos más generales, desafiar la complaciente linealidad y unidimensionalidad del derecho internacional al mostrar las dinámicas sesgadas de poder que entrecruzan el orden jurídico internacional. Al mismo tiempo, cuestionar las narrativas históricas usuales del derecho internacional ha permitido a los TWAILers recuperar proyectos y movimientos normativos internacionales alternativos que han estado orientados hacia el Sur: desde Bandung, como lo mencionaba antes, hasta el derecho de los pueblos y las naciones a ejercer soberanía permanente sobre sus riquezas y sus recursos naturales, el Movimiento No Alineado, el Nuevo Orden Económico Internacional, y La Vía Campesina.[9]

  1. El Imperio se mueve

Con un ojo en el longue dureé histórico de la ‘comunidad internacional’ y el otro en el impacto de sus estructuras e instituciones en los pueblos y entornos del Sur, los TWAILers se han visto forzados a desarrollar un concepción dinámica del imperialismo. Para ellos, al igual que para los historiadores marxistas, ‘el hombre hace su propia historia, pero no la hace como le place; no la hace bajo circunstancias que él mismo ha elegido sino por el contrario, bajo circunstancias preexistentes, dadas y transmitidas por el pasado’.[10]

Desde una perspectiva TWAIL, el imperialismo no es un fenómeno ‘histórico’ que puede ser acordonado en un momento en el pasado. En lugar de eso, el imperialismo consiste en un conjunto variado de acuerdos asimétricos y formas de integración condicionada que han viajado a lo largo del tiempo y el espacio, y a través de diferentes escalas y sitios de gobernanza (de lo internacional a lo nacional y a lo local; de lo público a lo privado; de lo ideológico a lo material; de lo humano a lo no-humano; y mucho más). Estas formas limitantes y perjudiciales de ordenar nuestro entorno nos hacen y re-hacen (incluso a nosotros mismos) todos los días.[11]

  1. El Sur se mueve

Si el imperio se mueve, el Sur también. Las categorías de Sur y Norte son usadas en el trabajo de TWAIL, no como diferenciadores estáticos, sino como categorías que nos permiten analizar la evolución (y las continuidades y discontinuidades) de las relaciones económicas, políticas y jurídicas globales. Esto incluye las causas y efectos de la migración internacional y los patrones de asilo; las preguntas en torno a la soberanía indígena alrededor del mundo; y el impacto que tienen en la pobreza y la inequidad el Fondo Monetario Internacional, el Banco Mundial y otras ponderosas instituciones internacionales entre y al interior de Estados tan diferentes como Grecia e Indonesia.[12]

En el trabajo desarrollado por TWAIL, las categorías del Sur y el Norte Global son entendidas, de esta manera, no como realidades fijas, sino como marcos dinámicos que deben ser aplicados y reconfigurados de acuerdo a las especificidades locales, las tendencias regionales y los grandes cambios del sistema económico y político global. En la actualidad esto es más importante que nunca debido a la creciente inequidad entre, y dentro, de los Estados y las regiones (una inequidad que, paradójicamente, sólo destaca nuestras responsabilidades interconectadas como habitantes de este, nuestro planeta antropocénico). ‘La mayor parte del mundo’ es de nuevo una muy buena descripción sobre dónde reside el corazón de TWAIL.

En este sentido, la innovación y la originalidad de TWAIL no solo tiene relación con su descripción sobre el carácter imperial del derecho internacional. Durante las últimas dos décadas, los académicos de TWAIL también han argumentado que el derecho de los derechos humanos es muy limitado respecto de lo que puede conseguir para negar los efectos del neoliberalismo.[13] Al mismo tiempo los TWAILers han argumentado que las políticas ortodoxas del desarrollo y los marcos para la inversión se encuentran sesgados a un nivel estructural. Todo este trabajo, el cual siempre ha sido siempre global en su enfoque, hoy por hoy se debe entender como profético en el entendido que estas mismas preocupaciones hoy están surgiendo de un manera clara en Norte Global y estan siendo denunciadas por los trabajos que se podrían clasificar como del mainstream.

  1. La lucha es múltiple

Si el imperialismo no es un asunto del pasado, y si el imperio se mueve al igual que el Sur, la lucha que los autores asociados a TWAIL libran es una de carácter múltiple y que toma lugar en terrenos diversos y cambiantes.

En su nivel más general, y cómo ya lo he mencionado, la lucha de TWAIL esta definida por generar claridad sobre la relación pasada y presente entre el imperialismo y derecho internacional. En un nivel más específico, sin embargo, esto implica identificar aquellos momentos en los que el imperialismo se ha convertido en un elemento constitutivo del orden jurídico internacional, así como aquellos escenarios particulares en los que el derecho internacional ha funcionado como el punto de apoyo del imperialismo. Juntando estas dos tareas, la agenda de TWAIL está dirigida a examinar y alterar análisis jurídicos usuales, y a avanzar un derecho internacional mucho más progresiva; lo que quiere decir un derecho internacional que preste atención a nuevas prácticas políticas, a nuevos sistemas político-económicos y al establecimiento de nuevos futuros. Como proyecto intelectual, TWAIL también se interesa tanto en la innovación académica como en el debido reconocimiento del importante trabajo que han adelantado los académicos de TWAIL y otros colegas.

  1. La lucha es aquí

Dada la amplitud de esta agenda de investigación y de acción política, los TWAILers han insistido en la importancia de atender, tal y como las académicas feministas nos han mostrado, tanto a lo personal como a lo político. Teniendo en cuenta la naturaleza agonizante de los Estados y los ciudadanos del Sur Global, esto es crucial. Emblemas de una vida independiente, más allá del dominio colonial, en muchas ocasiones los mismos Estados del Sur y sus ciudadanos han optado por las mismas características opresivas y xenofóbicas de las que pudieron escapar en algún momento. Voluntaria o involuntariamente atrapados en ciclos de producción y consumo destructivos, cómplices de la securitización de la vida diaria, y sordos a las protestas de los grupos indígenas y las minorías, el legado del imperialismo aún vive de manera visible e invisible en muchos Estados del Tercer Mundo.[14] Es por ello que para los académicos de TWAIL, la lucha continúa y debe continuar, siempre allí, y siempre aquí. La lucha es y siempre debe ser sobre las ‘tácticas’ actuales y sobre la ‘estrategia’ de largo plazo.[15]

Dos líneas finales para concluir. TWAIL es un movimiento, no una escuela; una red, no una institución; una sensibilidad, no una doctrina. Esta inquietud y este compromiso a la apertura se nutren de la diversidad del mundo al que TWAIL responde y donde renueva constantemente su vitalidad.

Debo agradecer a Jennifer Evans por su apoyo editorial y a Antony Anghie, Rob Knox, Vasuki Nesiah, Sundhya Pahuja, Rose Parfitt y John Reynolds por su cuidadosa lectura de las versiones preliminares de este blog. También quisiera agradecer al blog International Law Under Construction por su invitación inicial a escribir este resumen de TWAIL y por permitir que fuera publicado de nuevo por Critical Legal Thinking.

Luis Eslava es Profesor (Senior Lecturer) de Derecho Internacional y Co-Director del Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL) en la Universidad de Kent.

Traducción al español por Daniel Rivas-Ramírez. Daniel estudió derecho en la Universidad Externado de Colombia. Es coordinador editorial del Latin American Law Review, miembro en formación del Instituto Internacional de Derechos Humanos – Capítulo Colombia, y miembro observador de la Academia Colombiana de Derecho Internacional.

Translation into Spanish by Daniel Rivas-Ramírez. Daniel studied law at Universidad Externado de Colombia. He is the Managing Editor of Latin American Law Review. He is also a member of the Colombian Chapter of the International Institute of Human Rights and of the Colombian Academy of International Law.

[1] Esta fotografía de una calle en San Juan, Puerto Rico fue tomada por Jack Delano en 1941 como parte del famoso programa fotográfico de la pobreza rural de la Farm Security Administration (FSA) de los Estados Unidos (1935 – 1944). Este programa documentó la expansión de la pobreza rural que pretendía ser resuelta por la política de privatización de la tierra de la FSA, a través de su esquema de compra de tierras por parte de tenedores vía empréstitos. Tanto el programa de fotografía de la FSA como su esquema de préstamos para la compra de tierras fueron implementado tanto en los Estados Unidos como en Puerto Rico. Seducido por la cotidianidad de esta calle, repleta de letreros de Coca-Cola, la foto de Delano habla claramente de la larga relación (neo)colonial que ya existía entre los Estados Unidos y Puerto Rico, la cual se vino a expandir aún más con el modelo de privatización de la tierra de la FSA.

[2] Sobre el imperialismo “informal”, antes, durante y después de la era de la descolonización ver especialmente: John Gallagher and Ronald Robinson, ‘The Imperialism of Free Trade’, (1953) 6(1) The Economic History Review 1; W.M. Roger Louis and Ronald Robinson, ‘The Imperialism of Decolonization’, (1994) 22(3) The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 46

[3] La lista de publicaciones que pueden ser citadas es enorme. Aquí sólo ponemos algunos ejemplos. Sobre la revisión de la teoría y la historia general del derecho internacional y la operación del orden internacional desde una perspectiva TWAIL: Anthony Anghie, Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (CUP, 2004); B.S. Chimni, International Law and World Order (CUP, 2nd ed, 2017); Sundhya Pahuja, Decolonising International Law: Development, Economic Growth and the Politics of Universality (CUP, 2011); Luis Eslava, Local Space, Global Life: The Everyday Operation of International Law and Development (CUP, 2015). Sobre el rol de los abogados internacionalistas y los académicos del derecho internacional ver: Liliana Obregón, ‘Between Civilisation and Barbarism: Creole Interventions in International Law’ (2006) 27(5) Third World Quarterly 815; Luis Eslava and Sundhya Pahuja, ‘Between Resistance and Reform: TWAIL and the Universality of International Law’ (2011) 3 Trade Law and Development 103; Arnulf Becker Lorca, Mestizo International Law: A Global Intellectual History 1842–1933 (CUP, 2015); Adil Hasan Khan, ‘International Lawyers in the Aftermath of Disasters: Inheriting from Radhabinod Pal and Upendra Baxi’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2061. Sobre la reteorización del Estado ver: Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance (CUP, 2019). Sobre el derecho constitucional desde una perspectiva TWAIL: Zoran Oklopcic, ‘The South of Western Constitutionalism: A Map Ahead of a Journey’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2080. Sobre justicia transicional y discursos sobre seguridad: James T. Gathii, ‘The Use of Force, Freedom of Commerce, and Double Standards in Prosecuting Pirates in Kenya’ (2010) 59 American University Law Review 1321; Vasuki Nesiah, ‘Theorizing Transitional Justice’ in Anne Orford and Florian Hoffman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of International Legal Theory (OUP, 2016); John Reynolds, Empire, Emergency and International Law (CUP, 2017); Ntina Tzouvala, ‘TWAIL and the “Unwilling or Unable” Doctrine: Continuities and Ruptures’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 266. Sobre el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos: M. Mutua, ‘Savages, Victims, and Saviors: The Metaphor of Human Rights’ (2001) 42(1) Harvard International Law Journal 201. Sobre el derecho internacional económico: James T. Gathii and Ibironke Odumosu, ‘International Economic Law in the Third World’ (2009) 11 International Community Law Review 349; Michael Fakhri, Sugar and the Making of International Trade Law (CUP, 2014). Sobre el derecho internacional del medio ambiente: Usha Natarajan and Kishan Khoday ‘Locating Nature: Making and Unmaking International Law’ (2014) 27 Leiden Journal of International Law 573; Julia Dehm, ‘Post Paris Reflections: Fossil Fuels, Human Rights and the Need to Excavate New Ideas for Climate Justice’ (2017) 8(2) Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 280–300; Karin Mickelson, ‘International Law as a War against Nature? Reflections on the Ambivalence of International Environmental Law’ in Barbara Stark (ed.), International Law and Its Discontents: Confronting Crises (CUP, 2015). Sobre derecho internacional humanitario: Corri Zoli, ‘Islamic Contributions to International Humanitarian Law: Recalibrating TWAIL Approaches for Existing Contributions and Legacies’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 271. Sobre derecho penal internacional: Asad G. Kiyani, ‘Third World Approaches to International Criminal Law’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 255. Sobre las aproximaciones TWAIL a los movimientos sociales, los pueblos indígenas y los migrantes: Balakrishnan Rajagopal, International Law from Below: Development, Social Movements and Third World Resistance (CUP, 2003); Amar Bhatia, ‘The South of the North: Building on Critical Approaches to International Law with Lessons from the Fourth World’ (2012) 14 Oregon Review of International Law 131; Adrian A. Smith, ‘Migration, Development and Security within Racialised Global Capitalism: Refusing the Balance Game’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2119.

[4] Como materializaciones previas del compromiso de TWAIL a las cuestiones de la interseccionalidad global, el imperialismo y la decolonización, ver particularmente: Special Issue Villanova Law Review 45(5) (2000); Antony Anghie, Bhupinder Chimni, Karin Mickelson and Obiora C. Okafor (eds), The Third World and International Order (Brill, 2003). Con relación a la atención actual que TWAIL presta a la raza en términos de los procesos internacionales, ver por ejemplo: Rob Knox, ‘Race, Racialisation and Rivalry in the International Legal Order’ in Alexander Anievas, Nivi Manchanda, Robbie Shilliam (eds), Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (Routledge, 2015).

[5] Los historiadores orientados hacia el Sur también han venido haciendo una contribución importante al proyecto de desenterrar esas otras palabras propuestas por los intelectuales y actores políticos del Sur. Ver por ejemplo: Gary Wilder, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2014); Adom Getachew, Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination (Princeton University Press, 2019).

[6] Para un análisis desde la perspectiva TWAIL sobre la Opinión Consultiva sobre Chagos, ver: Miriam Bak McKenna, ‘Chagos Islands: UN ruling calls time on shameful British colonialism but UK still resisting’ (The Conversation, 28 February 2019).

[7] Con relación al compromiso de TWAIL con la historia y la historiografía ver: Anne Orford, ‘The Past as Law or History? The Relevance of Imperialism for Modern International Law’ (IILJ Working Paper, 2012/2). Para una presentación general sobre la importancia que tiene la historia para el trabajo de TWAIL ver, por ejemplo: George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo, ‘Force Field: On History and Theory of International Law’ (2012) 20 Journal of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History 86.

[8] En cuanto al imperialismo europeo y no europeo y la violencia que ha acompañado la forma del Estado alrededor del mundo: Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance (CUP, 2019).

[9] Ver Michael Fakhri, ‘Rethinking the Right to Food’ (Legal Form, 5 September 2018).

[10] Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (1852).

[11] En mi propio trabajo he intentado capturar esta dinámica y la amplia operación del imperialismo y el derecho internacional. Ver por ejemplo: Luis Eslava, ‘Istanbul Vignettes: Observing the Everyday Operation of International Law’ (2014) 2(1) London Review of International Law 3; ‘The Moving Location of Empire: Indirect Rule, International Law, and the Bantu Educational Kinema Experiment’ (2018) 31 Leiden Journal of International Law 539.

[12] Para un ejemplo reciente de esta comprensión dinámica del Sur y el Norte Global que refuerza el trabajo de TWAIL ver particularmente: John Linarelli, Margot E. Salomon, and Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah, The Misery of International Law: Confrontations with Injustice in the Global Economy (OUP, 2018).

[13] Ver especialmente el trabajo innovador y crítico sobre los derechos humanos de Upendra Baxi, The Future of Human Rights (OUP, 2002). Ver también, sobre las contribuciones actuals de TWAIL a la discusión sobre los derechos humanos: Ratna Kapur, Gender, Alterity and Human Rights: Freedom in a Fishbowl (Edward Elgar, 2018).

[14] Ver por ejemplo: Mohammad Shahabuddin, ‘Postcolonial Boundaries, International Law, and the Making of the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar’ (forthcoming, 2019) Asian Journal of International Law; Luis Eslava, ‘El Estado desarrollista: independencia, dependencia y la historia del Sur’ (2019) 43 Revista Derecho del Estado 25

[15] Robert Knox, ‘Strategy and Tactics’ (2010) 21 Finnish Yearbook of International Law 1.

– Spanish


+ Portuguese

Coordenadas TWAIL

 Luis Eslava

Gabriel Mantelli (tradutor)

Photo: Rua em San Juan, Porto Rico, 1941. Fonte: FSA-Office of War Information Collection. Biblioteca do Congresso, Washington, EUA.[1]

As ‘Abordagens do Terceiro Mundo ao Direito Internacional’, mais conhecidas por sua sigla (em inglês) TWAIL (Third World Approaches to International Law), são uma rede dinâmica, intencionalmente aberta e descentralizada de acadêmicos e acadêmicas da área do direito internacional que pensam sobre e com o Terceiro Mundo.

Dentro do universo das TWAIL, o ‘Terceiro Mundo’ se refere àquela geografia sociopolítica expansiva e geralmente subalterna que, em meados do século XX, passou a ser vista como ‘não-alinhada’ – não pertencendo nem ao mundo ‘livre’ nem ao ‘comunista’. Hoje em dia, porém, o Terceiro Mundo é mais referido como o ‘mundo em desenvolvimento’, o ‘mundo pós-colonial’ ou o Sul (Global). Em nossa ordem global intensamente desigual, racializada, gendrificada e ambientalmente precária, em que se confrontam uma proliferação de Suis no Norte e de Nortes do Sul, essa geografia sociopolítica talvez possa ser melhor caracterizada como ‘a maior parte do mundo’.

Uma primavera TWAIL

A rubrica TWAIL nasceu na primavera norte-americana de 1996 quando um grupo de estudantes da Harvard Law School se reuniu para discutir, como James Gathii nos conta, ‘se seria possível existir uma abordagem terceiro-mundista aplicada ao direito internacional e quais poderiam ser as principais preocupações de tal abordagem’. Esse conjunto inicial de discussões e as conversas que rapidamente se seguiram incluíram estudantes e acadêmicos de várias partes do Terceiro Mundo e outros companheiros do Norte Global.

O primeiro encontro das TWAIL foi realizado em março de 1997 na Harvard University. O principal objetivo – um dos que tem marcado o trabalho dos(as) TWAILers desde então – foi interrogar a neutralidade e a universalidade assumidas pelo direito internacional à luz de sua longa associação com o imperialismo, tanto histórico quanto contínuo. Um propósito paralelo foi delinear novas agendas emancipatórias – novas agendas de descolonização – para um mundo rapidamente globalizado. Como B. S. Chimni mais tarde colocou em seu Manifesto TWAIL, ‘a ameaça de recolonização’ continuava a assombrar o Terceiro Mundo. Diante dessa realidade, um novo conjunto de ferramentas teve de ser desenvolvido para ‘abordar as preocupações materiais e éticas dos povos do Terceiro Mundo’.

Em seu compromisso de explorar a relação entre o direito internacional e as realidades do Terceiro Mundo, esse grupo inicial de TWAILers evidenciou a importância de honrar uma linhagem já estabelecida de internacionalistas, atores políticos e intelectuais do Sul que haviam lutado por muito tempo contra as vicissitudes e complexidades da ordem jurídica internacional. Em particular, eles(as) tinham em mente figuras cujos papéis durante o período de descolonização foram fundamentais para questionar o fim do imperialismo ‘formal’.

Para dar sentido a essa longa tradição do direito internacional a partir do Sul, Antony Anghie e Chimni cunharam os termos ‘TWAIL I’ e ‘TWAIL II’: o primeiro termo para se referir ao conjunto de estudos e pensamentos produzidos por essa primeira geração de atores jurídicos internacionais pós-coloniais; o segundo, para o conjunto que ‘seguiu amplamente a tradição de TWAIL I, inspirando-se nela, enquanto, inevitavelmente, se afastava dela de maneiras significativas’.

Ao mapear essa cronologia retrospectiva, Anghie e Chimni enfatizaram o compromisso com a aprendizagem intergeracional que foi tão fundamental para as TWAIL. Ao mesmo tempo, eles puderam destacar o trabalho pioneiro de estudiosos contemporâneos das TWAIL (II) em questionar as condições do Sul de uma perspectiva mais global e interseccional. O trabalho das TWAIL I foi lutar contra o imperialismo formal no âmbito doméstico. Nossa luta – a luta dos(as) TWAILers II, III, IV e além – é lidar com os vestígios do imperialismo ‘formal’ e as formas expansivas e multidimensionais do ‘imperialismo informal’.[2]

O mundo das TWAIL

Nos anos que se seguiram, trabalhos dentro das TWAIL cresceram em termos de temas e do âmbito geográfico e histórico das pesquisas conduzidas por seus(suas) membros.

Revendo a teoria geral do direito internacional e desvelando sua história global; questionando o funcionamento da ordem internacional e o papel dos(as) internacionalistas dentro dela; buscando novas teorias para o Estado e revisitando discursos atuais de ordem constitucional, segurança e justiça transicional; cruzando o direito internacional com os campos dos direitos humanos, direito internacional econômico, direito internacional ambiental, direito internacional humanitário e direito penal internacional; destacando a importância dos movimentos sociais, povos indígenas e migrantes na ordem internacional – todos esses e muitos outros tópicos chamaram a atenção das TWAIL nos últimos anos.[3] A atenção aos cruzamentos entre raça, gênero e classe, bem como o estudo das formas passadas e presentes de descolonização e resistência, tem marcado esses trabalhos.[4]

O primeiro encontro das TWAIL em 1997 também inaugurou uma linha de conferências internacionais que serviram como pontos de encontro para compartilhar resultados de pesquisa, consolidar antigas e novas amizades e avaliar as perspectivas de reforma da pedagogia e prática do direito internacional. Os encontros foram realizados na Osgoode Hall Law School (2001), na Albany Law School (2007), na University of British Columbia (2008), na Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (2010), na Oregon Law School (2011), na American University in Cairo (2015), na University of Colombo (2017) e, mais recentemente, na National University of Singapore (2018).

Hoje, passados vinte anos após a primeira reunião das TWAIL, este conjunto de abordagens ocupa um lugar central nos debates sobre o passado e o presente da ordem jurídica internacional. De fato, não é demais dizer que as ideias trazidas pelas TWAIL e o trabalho produzido sob sua bandeira alteraram conceitos teleológicos profundamente estabelecidos no direito internacional – e as questionaram como sendo naturalmente progressistas e sempre do lado da justiça social, econômica e ambiental. Principalmente, a tônica eurocêntrica do direito internacional perdeu sua invisibilidade graças ao trabalho dos(as) TWAILers.

TWAILers, interessados(as) na temática e uma nova geração de estudantes e praticantes do direito internacional agora têm um grande e crescente conjunto de literatura que pode ser mobilizado para questionar as assimetrias globais de poder que há muito vêm acompanhando – e que não são externas a – o direito internacional. Graças às TWAIL, podem-se apontar para outros usos do direito internacional e para outros mundos que o Sul e seus companheiros do Norte tem tentado colocar em prática.[5]

TWAIL na Corte Internacional de Justiça

Uma confirmação do impacto crescente das TWAIL veio na forma de uma citação feita pelo Juiz Cançado Trindade à obra Bandung, Global History and International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2017) em sua Opinião Separada na recente Opinião Consultiva do caso do Arquipélago de Chagos no âmbito da Corte Internacional de Justiça (CIJ). Debates sobre autodeterminação e seu papel na ordem jurídica internacional moderna foram, é claro, anteriormente objeto de julgamentos detalhados e perspicazes por vários juristas do Terceiro Mundo – algumas dessas figuras das TWAIL I foram identificadas por Anghie e Chimni – tais como Mohammed Bedjaoui, Christopher Weeramantry e Fouad Ammoun.

A coletânea Bandung reuniu mais de 40 acadêmicos e acadêmicas associados com as TWAIL a fim de refletir criticamente sobre o aniversário de 60 anos da Conferência de Bandung. Realizada em 1955 em Bandung, na Indonésia, com a participação de 29 países africanos e asiáticos, a Conferência de Bandung condenou o ‘colonialismo em todas as suas manifestações’ como ‘um mal que deveria ser imediatamente encerrado’. A obra foi citada pelo Juiz Cançado Trindade justamente para enfatizar a relevância desse chamado para nossa ordem jurídica global supostamente pós-colonial. Quase por unanimidade, a CIJ decidiu que as Ilhas Chagos deveriam ser devolvidas às Ilhas Maurício ‘o mais rápido possível’ pelo Reino Unido, um de seus antigos senhores coloniais. Segundo o ICJ, a descolonização de 1968 das Ilhas Maurício não foi legalmente concluída.[6]

Como a Opinião Consultiva de Chagos demonstra, e como a coletânea de Bandung insiste, o colonialismo ainda não foi embora. Ele ainda faz parte da ordem internacional, transformando-se em novas formas a cada dia. Nesse aspecto, a reentrada das TWAIL nas câmaras da CIJ fortemente diz respeito à relevância contínua das TWAIL mesmo no contexto do ‘tribunal mundial’, a instituição central do direito internacional. Dados os insights das TWAIL sobre a implicação original e contínua do direito internacional nos arranjos imperiais que estão continuamente sendo reimplantados à nossa volta, no entanto, claramente seu trabalho não pode ser confinado ao tribunal. O trabalho acadêmico e o ativismo, interrompendo a ordem legal e institucional global sempre que possível, é sempre parte integrante de qualquer prática TWAIL.

Cinco coordenadas TWAIL

Na última parte deste rápido tour pelas TWAIL, deixe-me delinear cinco ‘coordenadas’ que caracterizam esse corpo compartilhado de pensamento e prática. Eu uso o termo ‘coordenadas’ em vez de ‘princípios’ porque os(as) TWAILers têm sido reticentes em descrever seu trabalho de acordo com um conjunto estático e empacotado de características, ou mesmo em aglomerar-se em torno de um cânone específico ou com determinada formação institucional. Em vez disso, as energias se concentraram em manter as TWAIL abertas a novas gerações de acadêmicos(as) e ativistas, a novas inovações conceituais e metodológicas e, em particular, à exploração de novas formas de criar solidariedade em nossa ordem internacional sempre desafiadora.

  1. A história é importante

Uma característica comum entre os(as) TWAILers é a apreciação da história e da historiografia.[7] Estudos das TWAIL geralmente retrocedem temporalmente para ganhar uma compreensão de como as normas internacionais e práticas institucionais surgiram e tem se desenvolvido através de conjunturas históricas específicas. A ‘descoberta’ das ‘Américas’; a expansão do imperialismo europeu sobre a Ásia e a África; as duas Guerras Mundiais; os sistemas de ‘mandato’ e ‘tutela’; o momento da descolonização; as crises do petróleo e da dívida externa da década de 1970; a erupção do neoliberalismo nos anos 1980 e 1990, e a longa ‘guerra ao terror’ são apenas algumas dessas conjunturas – juntamente com imperialismos não-europeus (do Império Chinês à República da Libéria) e incontáveis momentos de violência pós-colonial pelos Estados pós-coloniais.[8]

Prestar atenção a essas histórias variadas permitiu aos(às) TWAILers rastrearem a constituição conjunta do direito internacional e do imperialismo e, no geral, desafiarem  a linearidade complacente e unidimensional do direito internacional ao mostrar dinâmicas de poder enviesadas que permeiam a ordem jurídica internacional. Ao mesmo tempo, questionar a suposta história do direito internacional permitiu que os(as) TWAILers explorassem projetos normativos internacionais alternativos e movimentos que tivessem uma orientação para o Sul: de Bandung, como mencionado acima, para o direito de povos e nações a soberania permanente sobre seus recursos naturais, ao Movimento dos Não-Alinhados, à Nova Ordem Econômica Internacional, até à Via Campesina.[9]

  1. O Império se move

Com um olho na longue dureé da ‘comunidade internacional’ e a outro no impacto de suas estruturas e instituições sobre os povos e ambientes do Sul, os(as) TWAILers foram forçados a desenvolver um relato dinâmico do imperialismo. Para eles(as), como para os historiadores marxistas, ‘a humanidade faz sua própria história, mas não a faz como deseja; a humanidade não faz a história sob circunstâncias desejadas, mas sob circunstâncias já existentes, dadas e transmitidas do passado’.[10]

O imperialismo, segundo uma perspectiva TWAIL, não é, portanto, um fenômeno ‘histórico’ que possa ser isolado em algum lugar no passado. O imperialismo consiste, ao contrário, em um conjunto multifacetado de arranjos assimétricos e formas de integração condicional que atravessaram o tempo e o espaço, através de muitas escalas e espaços de governança – do internacional ao nacional e ao local; do público ao privado; do ideológico ao material; do humano para o não-humano, e além. Essas formas restritivas e prejudiciais de ordenação fazem e refazem o nosso meio – e nós mesmos – diariamente.[11]

  1. O Sul se move

Se o império se move, o Sul também se move. As categorias do Sul e do Norte não são usadas nos estudos TWAIL como marcadores duros de diferenciação, mas para analisar a evolução – e as continuidades e descontinuidades – das relações econômicas, políticas e jurídicas globais. Isso inclui as causas e efeitos da migração internacional; questões de soberania indígena em todo o mundo; e o impacto do FMI, do Banco Mundial e de outras instituições internacionais poderosas sobre a pobreza e a desigualdade dentro e entre Estados tão diferentes quanto a Grécia e a Indonésia.[12]

No trabalho das TWAIL, as categorias de Sul e Norte Globais são entendidas não como realidades fixas, mas como estruturas dinâmicas que devem ser aplicadas e reconfiguradas em resposta a especificidades locais, tendências regionais e mudanças maiores no sistema econômico e político global. Hoje, isso é mais pertinente do que nunca, pois enfrentamos um aprofundamento da desigualdade entre e dentro dos Estados e regiões – uma desigualdade que, paradoxalmente, apenas enfatiza nossas responsabilidades interconectadas como habitantes deste nosso planeta antropocêntrico. ‘A maior parte do mundo’ é novamente uma boa descrição de onde está o coração das TWAIL.

Portanto, não é apenas em relação ao caráter imperialista do direito internacional que a produção acadêmica das TWAIL tem sido pioneira e original. Nas últimas duas décadas, estudiosos e estudiosas das TWAIL têm argumentado que o arcabouço jurídico dos direitos humanos é muito limitado no que pode alcançar para negar os efeitos do neoliberalismo.[13] TWAILers também tem argumentado que as políticas ortodoxas de desenvolvimento e de investimento são estruturalmente tendenciosas. Essa produção, que sempre foi global em seu enfoque, está agora se mostrando profética, já que essas mesmas preocupações estão claramente emergindo nas localidades do Norte e suscitando conclusões similares no âmbito de discussões mainstream.

  1. A luta é múltipla

Se o imperialismo não é uma questão do passado, e se o império se move exatamente como o Sul se move, então percebe-se que as lutas em que as TWAIL estão envolvidas acontecem em múltiplas frentes e em um terreno diverso e inconstante.

No geral, a luta das TWAIL é esclarecer o registro histórico sobre a relação entre o direito internacional e o imperialismo passado e presente. Em termos específicos, envolve identificar os momentos-chave em que o imperialismo se tornou um elemento constitutivo da ordem jurídica internacional e os locais específicos em que o direito internacional tem sido o fulcro do império. Tomados em conjunto, a agenda das TWAIL é direcionada para examinar e alterar os entendimentos jurídicos e redistribuir o direito de uma forma mais progressista; o que significa, de certo modo, estar atento às práticas e horizontes econômicos e políticos. Como um projeto intelectual, as TWAIL também se preocupam tanto com a inovação acadêmica quanto com o devido reconhecimento dos importantes estudos feitos pelos estudiosos das TWAIL e de outras abordagens.

  1. A luta está aqui

Dada essa ampla agenda de pesquisa e ação política, os(as) TWAILers tem insistido na importância de atentar, como os(as) acadêmicos(as) feministas argumentam, tanto para o aspecto pessoal quanto para o político dessas discussões. Isso é crucial dada a natureza agonística dos Estados e cidadãos e cidadãs no Sul Global. São emblemas – muitas vezes – de uma vida independente após o domínio colonial, e muitas delas têm assumido as mesmas características opressivas e xenófobas de onde se desprenderam. Preso, voluntariamente ou não, em ciclos de produção e consumo destrutivo; cúmplice na securitização radical da vida cotidiana; surdo aos protestos de grupos e minorias indígenas ainda colonizados, o legado do imperialismo continua vivo em um sentido ativo e passivo em muitos Estados do Terceiro Mundo.[14] Para estudiosos(as) das TWAIL, portanto, a luta permanece e deve permanecer sempre ali e sempre aqui. É, e deve ser sempre, sobre ‘táticas’ presentes e sobre uma ‘estratégia’ mais longa.[15]

Duas linhas para concluir. TWAIL é um movimento, não uma escola; uma rede, não uma instituição; uma sensibilidade, não uma doutrina. Esta inquietude e compromisso com a abertura são nutridos, acima de tudo, pela diversidade do mundo ao qual as TWAIL respondem e da qual o seu ímpeto surge.

Agradeço Jenifer Evans por seu apoio editorial e Antony Anghie, Rob Knox, Vasuki Nesiah, Sundhya Pahuja, Rose Parfitt e John Reynolds por suas leituras atentas às versões iniciais deste texto. Eu também gostaria de agradecer ao blog International Law Under Construction por seu convite inicial para escrever esse panorama sobre TWAIL e por permitir que o texto fosse republicado pelo Critical Legal Thinking.

Luis Eslava é Professor (Senior Lecturer) de Direito e codiretor do Center for Critical International Law (CeCIL) na University of Kent.

Tradução para o português realizada por Gabriel Mantelli. Gabriel é pesquisador em direito, com mestrado em Direito e Desenvolvimento pela FGV Direito SP e graduação em direito pela USP. Foi pesquisador visitante na Kent Law School (Inglaterra). Trabalha nas áreas de direito e desenvolvimento, direito ambiental, direito internacional e estudos pós-coloniais/descoloniais.

Translation into Portuguese by Gabriel Mantelli. Gabriel is a Brazilian legal scholar. He has a Masters in Law and Development from FGV, Sao Paulo, a BA from USP, and has been a visiting training fellow at Kent Law School. He works in international law, law and development, environmental law and postcolonial and decolonial studies.

[1] Essa fotografia de uma rua em San Juan, Porto Rico, foi tirada por Jack Delano em 1941, como parte de um famoso programa de fotografia de pobreza rural coordenado pela Farm Security Administration (FSA) dos Estados Unidos entre 1935 e 1944. Este programa documentou a pobreza rural generalizada que a política de privatização de terras da FSA, de esquemas de empréstimo e compra de terras, foi projetada para resolver. O programa de fotografia da FSA e seus esquemas de compra de terras foram aplicados tanto no continente americano quanto em Porto Rico. Seduzida por essa rua cotidiana, com seus já onipresentes cartazes da Coca-Cola, a imagem de Delano atesta os detalhes de uma longa relação (neo)colonial entre os EUA e Porto Rico, em que a unidade de privatização da FSA consolidou ainda mais.

[2] Sobre imperialismo ‘informal’ antes, durante e depois da época da descolonização, ver especialmente, John Gallagher and Ronald Robinson, ‘The Imperialism of Free Trade’, (1953) 6(1) The Economic History Review 1; W.M. Roger Louis and Ronald Robinson, ‘The Imperialism of Decolonization’, (1994) 22(3) The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 462.

[3] A lista de publicações é enorme – aqui vão apenas alguns exemplos. Sobre revisitações na teoria geral e na história do direito internacional e a na operação da ordem internacional por meio de uma perspectiva TWAIL, Anthony Anghie, Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (CUP, 2004); B.S. Chimni, International Law and World Order (CUP, 2nd ed, 2017); Sundhya Pahuja, Decolonising International Law: Development, Economic Growth and the Politics of Universality (CUP, 2011); Luis Eslava, Local Space, Global Life: The Everyday Operation of International Law and Development (CUP, 2015). Sobre o papel da academia e de internacionalistas ver, Liliana Obregón, ‘Between Civilisation and Barbarism: Creole Interventions in International Law’ (2006) 27(5) Third World Quarterly 815; Luis Eslava and Sundhya Pahuja, ‘Between Resistance and Reform: TWAIL and the Universality of International Law’ (2011) 3 Trade Law and Development 103; Arnulf Becker Lorca, Mestizo International Law: A Global Intellectual History 1842–1933 (CUP, 2015); Adil Hasan Khan, ‘International Lawyers in the Aftermath of Disasters: Inheriting from Radhabinod Pal and Upendra Baxi’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2061. Sobre novas teorias do Estado, Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance (CUP, 2019). Sobre direito constitucional por meio de uma abordagem TWAIL, Zoran Oklopcic, ‘The South of Western Constitutionalism: A Map Ahead of a Journey’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2080. Sobre justiça de transição e discursos de segurança, James T. Gathii, ‘The Use of Force, Freedom of Commerce, and Double Standards in Prosecuting Pirates in Kenya’ (2010) 59 American University Law Review 1321; Vasuki Nesiah, ‘Theorizing Transitional Justice’ in Anne Orford and Florian Hoffman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of International Legal Theory (OUP, 2016); John Reynolds, Empire, Emergency and International Law (CUP, 2017); Ntina Tzouvala, ‘TWAIL and the “Unwilling or Unable” Doctrine: Continuities and Ruptures’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 266. Sobre direitos humanos, M. Mutua, ‘Savages, Victims, and Saviors: The Metaphor of Human Rights’ (2001) 42(1) Harvard International Law Journal 201. Sobre direito internacional econômico, James T. Gathii and Ibironke Odumosu, ‘International Economic Law in the Third World’ (2009) 11 International Community Law Review 349; Michael Fakhri, Sugar and the Making of International Trade Law (CUP, 2014). Sobre direito internacional ambiental, Usha Natarajan and Kishan Khoday ‘Locating Nature: Making and Unmaking International Law’ (2014) 27 Leiden Journal of International Law 573; Julia Dehm, ‘Post Paris Reflections: Fossil Fuels, Human Rights and the Need to Excavate New Ideas for Climate Justice’ (2017) 8(2) Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 280–300; Karin Mickelson, ‘International Law as a War against Nature? Reflections on the Ambivalence of International Environmental Law’ in Barbara Stark (ed.), International Law and Its Discontents: Confronting Crises (CUP, 2015). Sobre direito internacional humanitário, Corri Zoli, ‘Islamic Contributions to International Humanitarian Law: Recalibrating TWAIL Approaches for Existing Contributions and Legacies’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 271. On international criminal law, Asad G. Kiyani, ‘Third World Approaches to International Criminal Law’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 255. Sobre abordagens TWAIL aplicadas aos movimentos sociais, povos indígenas e migrantes, Balakrishnan Rajagopal, International Law from Below: Development, Social Movements and Third World Resistance (CUP, 2003); Amar Bhatia, ‘The South of the North: Building on Critical Approaches to International Law with Lessons from the Fourth World’ (2012) 14 Oregon Review of International Law 131; Adrian A. Smith, ‘Migration, Development and Security within Racialised Global Capitalism: Refusing the Balance Game’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2119.

[4] Como primeiras materializações do compromisso das TWAIL com questões de interseccionalidade, imperialismo e descolonização no âmbito global, ver especialmente, Special Issue Villanova Law Review 45(5) (2000); Antony Anghie, Bhupinder Chimni, Karin Mickelson and Obiora C. Okafor (eds), The Third World and International Order (Brill, 2003). Ver, por exemplo, na atenção recorrente das TWAIL à questão racial em termos de processos internacionais, Rob Knox, ‘Race, Racialisation and Rivalry in the International Legal Order’ in Alexander Anievas, Nivi Manchanda, Robbie Shilliam (eds), Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (Routledge, 2015).

[5] Historiadores do Sul Global também têm dado uma contribuição extremamente significativa ao projeto de escavação daqueles outros mundos propostos pelos intelectuais e atores políticos do Sul. Ver, por exemplo, Gary Wilder, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2014); Adom Getachew, Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination (Princeton University Press, 2019).

[6] Para uma análise do caso Chagos a partir de uma perspectiva TWAIL, ver, por exemplo, Miriam Bak McKenna, ‘Chagos Islands: UN ruling calls time on shameful British colonialism but UK still resisting’ (The Conversation, 28 February 2019).

[7] Sobre o engajamento das TWAIL com história e historiografia, Anne Orford, ‘The Past as Law or History? The Relevance of Imperialism for Modern International Law’ (IILJ Working Paper, 2012/2). Para um panorama da importância da história para TWAIL, ver, por exemplo, George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo, ‘Force Field: On History and Theory of International Law’ (2012) 20 Journal of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History 86.

[8] Sobre imperialismo europeu e não-europeu, e a violência que tem acompanhado o Estado por todo o mundo, ver Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance (CUP, 2019).

[9] Ver, por exemplo, Michael Fakhri, ‘Rethinking the Right to Food’ (Legal Form, 5 September 2018).

[10] Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (1852).

[11] Em meu próprio trabalho, tenho buscado capturar essa dinâmica e a operação em sentido amplo entre o imperialismo e o direito internacional. Ver, por exemplo, Luis Eslava, ‘Istanbul Vignettes: Observing the Everyday Operation of International Law’ (2014) 2(1) London Review of International Law 3; ‘The Moving Location of Empire: Indirect Rule, International Law, and the Bantu Educational Kinema Experiment’ (2018) 31 Leiden Journal of International Law 539.

[12] Para um exemplo recente dessa compreensão dinâmica do Sul Global e do Norte Global que sustenta o trabalho das TWAIL, ver especialmente, John Linarelli, Margot E. Salomon, and Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah, The Misery of International Law: Confrontations with Injustice in the Global Economy (OUP, 2018).

[13] Ver especialmente o inovador trabalho sobre direitos humanos de Upendra Baxi, The Future of Human Rights (OUP, 2002). Para recentes contribuições das TWAIL nos debates de direitos humanos, ver Ratna Kapur, Gender, Alterity and Human Rights: Freedom in a Fishbowl (Edward Elgar, 2018).

[14] Ver, por exemplo, Mohammad Shahabuddin, ‘Postcolonial Boundaries, International Law, and the Making of the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar’ (forthcoming, 2019) Asian Journal of International Law; Luis Eslava, ‘The Developmental State: Dependency and Independency and the History of the South’ in Philipp Dann and Jochen von Bernstorff (eds), The Battle for International Law (forthcoming, 2019, OUP).

[15] Robert Knox, ‘Strategy and Tactics’ (2010) 21 Finnish Yearbook of International Law 1.

– Portuguese

Show 15 footnotes

  1. This photograph of a street in San Juan, Puerto Rico was taken by Jack Delano in 1941, as part of the United States’ famous Farm Security Administration (FSA) rural poverty photography program (1935-44). This program documented the widespread rural poverty which the FSA’s policy of land privatization, via tenant purchase borrowing schemes, was designed to address. The FSA’s photography program and its tenant purchase borrowing schemes were applied both on US mainland and in Puerto Rico. Seduced by this everyday street, with its already-ubiquitous Coca-Cola signs, Delano’s image testifies to the fine details of a long (neo)colonial relationship between the US and Puerto Rico, which the FSA’s privatisation drive entrenched still further.
  2. On ‘informal’ imperialism, before, during and after the decolonisation era, see especially, John Gallagher and Ronald Robinson, ‘The Imperialism of Free Trade’, (1953) 6(1) The Economic History Review 1; W.M. Roger Louis and Ronald Robinson, ‘The Imperialism of Decolonization’, (1994) 22(3) The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History 462.
  3. The list of citeable publications is enormous – here are just some examples. On revisions of the general theory and history of international law and the operation of the international order from a TWAIL perspective, Anthony Anghie, Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (CUP, 2004); B.S. Chimni, International Law and World Order (CUP, 2nd ed, 2017); Sundhya Pahuja, Decolonising International Law: Development, Economic Growth and the Politics of Universality (CUP, 2011); Luis Eslava, Local Space, Global Life: The Everyday Operation of International Law and Development (CUP, 2015). See on the role of international lawyers and scholars, Liliana Obregón, ‘Between Civilisation and Barbarism: Creole Interventions in International Law’ (2006) 27(5) Third World Quarterly 815; Luis Eslava and Sundhya Pahuja, ‘Between Resistance and Reform: TWAIL and the Universality of International Law’ (2011) 3 Trade Law and Development 103; Arnulf Becker Lorca, Mestizo International Law: A Global Intellectual History 1842–1933 (CUP, 2015); Adil Hasan Khan, ‘International Lawyers in the Aftermath of Disasters: Inheriting from Radhabinod Pal and Upendra Baxi’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2061. On retheorisations of the state, Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance (CUP, 2019). On constitutional law from a TWAIL perspective, Zoran Oklopcic, ‘The South of Western Constitutionalism: A Map Ahead of a Journey’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2080. On transitional justice and security discourses, James T. Gathii, ‘The Use of Force, Freedom of Commerce, and Double Standards in Prosecuting Pirates in Kenya’ (2010) 59 American University Law Review 1321; Vasuki Nesiah, ‘Theorizing Transitional Justice’ in Anne Orford and Florian Hoffman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of International Legal Theory (OUP, 2016); John Reynolds, Empire, Emergency and International Law (CUP, 2017); Ntina Tzouvala, ‘TWAIL and the “Unwilling or Unable” Doctrine: Continuities and Ruptures’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 266. On international human rights law, M. Mutua, ‘Savages, Victims, and Saviors: The Metaphor of Human Rights’ (2001) 42(1) Harvard International Law Journal 201. On international economic law, James T. Gathii and Ibironke Odumosu, ‘International Economic Law in the Third World’ (2009) 11 International Community Law Review 349; Michael Fakhri, Sugar and the Making of International Trade Law (CUP, 2014). On international environmental law, Usha Natarajan and Kishan Khoday ‘Locating Nature: Making and Unmaking International Law’ (2014) 27 Leiden Journal of International Law 573; Julia Dehm, ‘Post Paris Reflections: Fossil Fuels, Human Rights and the Need to Excavate New Ideas for Climate Justice’ (2017) 8(2) Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 280–300; Karin Mickelson, ‘International Law as a War against Nature? Reflections on the Ambivalence of International Environmental Law’ in Barbara Stark (ed.), International Law and Its Discontents: Confronting Crises (CUP, 2015). On international humanitarian law, Corri Zoli, ‘Islamic Contributions to International Humanitarian Law: Recalibrating TWAIL Approaches for Existing Contributions and Legacies’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 271. On international criminal law, Asad G. Kiyani, ‘Third World Approaches to International Criminal Law’ (2015) 109 AJIL Unbound 255. On TWAIL approaches to social movements, Indigenous peoples and migrants; Balakrishnan Rajagopal, International Law from Below: Development, Social Movements and Third World Resistance (CUP, 2003); Amar Bhatia, ‘The South of the North: Building on Critical Approaches to International Law with Lessons from the Fourth World’ (2012) 14 Oregon Review of International Law 131; Adrian A. Smith, ‘Migration, Development and Security within Racialised Global Capitalism: Refusing the Balance Game’ (2016) 37(11) Third World Quarterly 2119.
  4. As early materialisations of TWAIL’s commitment to questions of global intersectionality, imperialism, and decolonisation, see especially, Special Issue Villanova Law Review 45(5) (2000); Antony Anghie, Bhupinder Chimni, Karin Mickelson and Obiora C. Okafor (eds), The Third World and International Order (Brill, 2003). See for example, on TWAIL ongoing attention to race in terms of international proceses, Rob Knox, ‘Race, Racialisation and Rivalry in the International Legal Order’ in Alexander Anievas, Nivi Manchanda, Robbie Shilliam (eds), Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (Routledge, 2015).
  5. South-oriented historians have also been making an extremely significant contribution to the project of excavating those other worlds proposed by South intellectuals and political actors. See for example, Gary Wilder, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2014); Adom Getachew, Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination (Princeton University Press, 2019).
  6. For a TWAIL oriented analysis of the Chagos Advisory opinion, see e.g., Miriam Bak McKenna, ‘Chagos Islands: UN ruling calls time on shameful British colonialism but UK still resisting’ (The Conversation, 28 February 2019).
  7. On TWAIL’s engagement with history and historiography, Anne Orford, ‘The Past as Law or History? The Relevance of Imperialism for Modern International Law’ (IILJ Working Paper, 2012/2). On an overview of the importance of history to TWAIL wcholarship, see e.g., George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo, ‘Force Field: On History and Theory of International Law’ (2012) 20 Journal of the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History 86.
  8. See on European and non-European imperialism, and the violence that has accompanied the state form across the world, Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance (CUP, 2019).
  9. See e.g., Michael Fakhri, ‘Rethinking the Right to Food’ (Legal Form, 5 September 2018).
  10. Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (1852).
  11. In my own work I have tried to capture this dynamic and broad operation of imperialism and international law. See for example, Luis Eslava, ‘Istanbul Vignettes: Observing the Everyday Operation of International Law’ (2014) 2(1) London Review of International Law 3; ‘The Moving Location of Empire: Indirect Rule, International Law, and the Bantu Educational Kinema Experiment’ (2018) 31 Leiden Journal of International Law 539.
  12. For a recent example of this dynamic understanding of the Global South and North that underpins TWAIL-oriented work, see especially, John Linarelli, Margot E. Salomon, and Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah, The Misery of International Law: Confrontations with Injustice in the Global Economy (OUP, 2018).
  13. See especially the critical groundbreaking work on human rights by Upendra Baxi, The Future of Human Rights (OUP, 2002). See on the ongoing TWAIL contributions to human rights debates, Ratna Kapur, Gender, Alterity and Human Rights: Freedom in a Fishbowl (Edward Elgar, 2018).
  14. See e.g., Mohammad Shahabuddin, ‘Postcolonial Boundaries, International Law, and the Making of the Rohingya Crisis in Myanmar’ (forthcoming, 2019) Asian Journal of International Law; Luis Eslava, ‘The Developmental State: Dependency and Independency and the History of the South’ in Philipp Dann and Jochen von Bernstorff (eds), The Battle for International Law (forthcoming, 2019, OUP).
  15. Robert Knox, ‘Strategy and Tactics’ (2010) 21 Finnish Yearbook of International Law 1.

  2 comments for “TWAIL Coordinates

  1. Aditya Roy
    2 April 2019 at 8:55 pm

    Good article covering all the intricacies about TWAIL.

  2. Muthoni
    20 April 2019 at 5:15 pm

    Such good read. Just wanted to add that in 2018 the University of Pretoria hosted a TWAIL themed conference too with an emphasis on African approaches to international law.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.