Admin

Time & Money; Prof Esther Leslie

London Consortium Event: Prof. Esther Leslie, Friday 24 June, 6.30 pm Birkbeck College, Room B20, Malet Street, Bloomsbury London WC1E 7HX Time and money , as the old adage goes, are co-articulated. This paper considers in particular the watch and the clock as they come to the fore in the writings of Georg Simmel and…

Event: The Rise of the Indignant

Wednesday 22nd, June: 6.30pm Room B04 Birkbeck Main Building: Free – open to all – no registration When Stephane Hessel wrote in Time for Outrage! that indignation with injustice should turn to ‘a peaceful insurrection’ perhaps he did not expect that the movement of ‘indignados’ in Spain and ‘aganaktismenoi’ (outraged) in Greece would take his advice…

Charging Protestors

Last Thursday and Friday saw around forty-two people in the dock at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on charges relating to the protests before and after Christmas (10th, 24th and 30th November, 9th December 2010 and 26th March 2011). The court were clearly in a rush to get all the pleas entered – they saw almost all…

Ten Years After…. On-line Streamed Conference

The events of 11 September 2001 enabled western states to radically transform their counterterrorism practices. This conference aims to critically engage with this transformation; to map how the ‘war on terror’ is changing and shaping new areas of our everyday lives and identify the challenges ahead for those fighting for human rights across the security…

The New School for Privatised Inquiry

In 1919, John Dewey and others founded The New School for Social Research, intended to offer a democratic and general education for those excluded by existing structures. On the faculty side, this meant a staunch defence of academic freedom in the face of increasing censorship and a climate of intellectual fear. For students, it meant…

Reanimating Human Rights

It seems that the discussion over intervention in Libya and revolutions in Arab countries is over. In the midst of discussion over legality or righteousness of the intervention in Libya, the problem of the victims of the situation that lead to the intervention (and earlier to the uprising) seems to disappear. Arguments are concentrated around…

Indignants at Syntagma – Greece

Following the Spanish los Indignados protests, a number of days ago a facebook page suggested a similar protest in Syntagma Square in Athens on the 25th of May, at 6pm. Similar events are occuring in Thessaloniki, Patras and Heraklion. The live feed (click the picture) is amazing to watch. We wish them luck.

Class and Gender in Super-Injunctions

For the past three weeks, the media has been swamped with tales of superinjunctions. The press claim superinjunctions curtail freedom of speech, while celebrities and their lawyers argue that they are necessary to protect individual privacy. In my view, the claim to privacy is inconsistent. If it applied to all individuals equally, there might be…

Call for global solidarity with the people of Spain

Solidarity protests and sit-ins are spreading around the world like a wildfire — find a rally near you and join the revolution! From Santiago de Compostella to Shanghai, and from Wellington to Washington, D.C., over 520 cities in the world are witnessing protests in solidarity with the people of Spain this weekend. Like Tahrir Square…

Ghost Manifesto – Spain’s Real Democracy Now

Items of agreement for the plural manifesto prepared during the morning of the 18th of May in Puerta del Sol. Those assembled in Puerta del Sol, aware that this is an action in progress and of resistance, have agreed to declare the following: After many years of apathy, a group of citizens of different ages…

In Athens, austerity puts revolution back on the menu

What were the finance ministers of Germany, France and Greece thinking when they met each other at a Luxembourg castle for ‘top-secret’ dinner talks on the resurging Greek debt crisis last weekend? As their five-star banquet was being served, did they discuss the human tragedy that is currently unfolding in Greece? Did they consider the…

The Queen’s Irish Visit

The British Queen is visiting the Republic of Ireland, one hundred years since the last British monarch set foot on the shores. In this context, our friends at Irish Left Review have posted James Connolly’s letter to the Irish Workers’ movement, which is well worth reposting here: Fellow-Workers, As you are aware from reading the…

Bin Laden, Targeted Killing & The Elimination of Danger

As the euphoria surrounding the announcement of Osama bin Laden’s death wears off, and the initial stories of ‘gunfights’ and ‘human shields’ are radically revised, serious doubts are emerging as to the legality of the entire operation. Legal experts have criticised the US for failing to take bin Laden into custody, according him due process…

Capitalism & Legal Subjectivity in the Age of Globalisation

A Prelude: Terra’s Predicament Once upon a time there was a planet – perfect green and egg-shell blue. It hung, fragile and ancient, in the yawning firmament of space-time. On the planet-surface – a thin crust riding a molten sea –one species outreached all others, reaching for the vaulted heavens with an inventiveness that far…

Mayday International Project

Criticallegalthinking.com is delighted to be involved in a new international grouping that seeks to challenge the necessity of austerity politics, entitled Mayday International. The introduction to this project reads: Europe stands at a crossroads. Successive waves of fiscal austerity have been imposed by European and domestic elites on the people of Greece, Ireland and Portugal,…

What Kind of Law is This?

Many aspects of the Libyan situation remain unclear: the scope of the mandate given to UN member states by Security Council Resolution 1973, the broader aims of the intervention, how many civilians have been killed and by whom, and who the rebels represent. One thing, however, seems clear: the international intervention is considered to be…

War, Apparatus, Witness

Jean-Luc Nancy’s Philosophical Chronicles, published in 2004, and originally broadcast over eleven months on France Culture radio with the intention to connect ‘philosophy with several nodes of contemporary life’ (xi). One of these chronicles (‘28 March 2003’) was simultaneous with the ‘beginning of what one calls “war”’ (45). The reference, of course, is to the…