Illan rua Wall

Associate Professor of Law at Warwick Law School, University of Warwick.

The Public Life of Private Law Workshop at the University of Warwick

Legal scholarship on the relationship between private law and human rights is dominated by (i) ‘constitutionalisation’; the idea that private law will absorb human rights norms over time  (ii) the instrumental use of private law to enforce compliance with human rights norms. But in many respects private obligation stands apart from human rights law, and as an alternative to…

Southampton CLEG Seminar Series, 15 Feb 2012

The Southampton Centre for Law, Ethics and Globalization has two great speakers coming up this semester – Angus MacDonald and Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos. Angus MacDonald – Thinking Against Constituted Law; A Response to Oren Ben-Dor (15/02/2012, Law Building Rm 2055) Oren Ben-Dor has argued that “Critical legal scholarship seemed to be capable of being both against…

Los Indignados: Manifesto Against the Plundering of the Commons

Spain has been the theatre of a prolonged speculative wave that ended abruptly in 2007, having been one of the world leaders in the cycle of real estate-financial accumulation. Spanish capitalism took advantage of an intensive use of the territory that guaranteed strong profit rates, with the support of large masses of capital acquired on…

Dissensus, the Right to Education & A New Latin American Student Movement

Recently, there have been the rumblings of an emergent pan-Latin American student movement. Crucially, this potential movement coheres around the demand for a right to education. In Colombia and Chile a new front is being fought against the creation and maintenance of private education and the implicit commodification of learning. However, this emergent trans-continental rights-demand…

The Irish Crisis: Europe Colonises Itself

What the middle-​classes of Europe are waking up to is some­thing that co­lo­nial peoples have known for a long time In a recent brief exchange between Oscar Guardiola Rivera and Walter Mignolo, responding to an impossibly broad question about Europe’s current crisis, Guardiola Rivera quipped that Europe was colonising itself. Just think, he said, of…

The Irish Crisis

In recent months the Irish crisis has disappeared from the international news. But that has not stopped the crushing cuts. Last sunday night the Taoiseach (the leader of the executive) addressed the nation. On monday and tuesday, an exceptional two-day budget was announced – the first of the new centre-left coalition. Ireland is the trustworthy PIG…

The Dis-enclosure of Constituent Power: Tunisia, Agamben & Nancy

In much of the conventional analysis, constituent power is used to signify an opening of constitutionalism to its other. It is framed as an alterity that legitimates and facilitates the constitution. As such, the constituent moment has an intensely temporal quality. It is either always-already past or it is to come. Either way, its alterity…

Violence at the Edge: Tottenham, Athens, Paris

Few are willing to make comparisons between this past year’s radical political activity – from the student protests to the major TUC demonstration – and the Tottenham riots. The reasons for this are fairly obvious: there is no unifying political goal of these ‘looters’, ‘hooligans’ and ‘thugs’. Theirs instead appears to be a ‘consumerism of…

Anger and Indignation in Ireland, Greece & Tunisia

Politics is back on the streets of Europe, that much is clear. The PIGS are striking back. Portugal, Ireland Greece and Spain. Except that’s not quite right. I will address the failure of Irish radicalism and contrast that with Greece and Tunisia, in order to begin to pull out a number of important lessons of…

Libyan War and Revolution – Unity & Multiplicity

The war that has been escalated in Libya over the last week is not the same as the revolt that gripped the country months ago. Even today in Benghazi there are two orders – war and revolt – at work, but the logic of war is destroying the multiplicity of a revolution. In this sense,…

Zizek on Equity & Trusts… well almost…

Equity is something of a problem. Aside from the blatant patriarchy of the Presumption of Advancement or Common Intention Constructive Trusts, it is often a little difficult to smuggle critical (legal) theory into an Equity and Trusts course. A long time ago now, Cotterrell wrote: Legal doctrine is ideologically important not only for what it…

Anonymous & the Discourse of Human Rights

In the last months, we have seen the emergence of ‘Anonymous’. In particular, in the days after the widespread attack on Wikileaks (following their publication of leaked US diplomatic memos) they emerged with a fairly credible threat to take down major global internet presences (belonging to both states and corporations). They have continued to post…

What we are reading… The Conception of Law | Antonio Gramsci

A conception of the Law which must be an essentially innovatory one is not to be found, integrally, in any pre-existing doctrine…. If every state tends to create and maintain a certain type of civilisation and of citizen (and hence of collective life and of individual relations), and to eliminate certain customs and attitudes and…

The Irish Catastrophe: BudgetJam

For excellent coverage of the Irish Bailout-Budget, please keep an eye to BudgetJam over on politico.ie.  Here is their introduction to a week of blogging: On Wednesday 24 of November we learnt that “Securing Ireland’s Future” involves cuts to the minimum wage and a moralised attack on social welfare. This vision of ‘security’ provides yet…

An Introduction: Legal Surrealism

We thought it might be an interesting idea of post a number of texts of a legal surrealism. We will publish a series of texts from and on the juridical writings of surrealism. As a jurisprudence it has, essentially, been written out of the canon. However, if time is taken over the texts we think…