Lucy Finchett-Maddock

Nowhere Left to Dance: ScumTek, the Electronic Underground and Neoliberal Mainstreamism

As I sat down to write this piece on some of the less credited and understood sonorous movements in the UK and their affecting encounters with law, snippets of David Cameron’s pronouncements on ‘blitzing poverty’ and ‘bulldozing the UK’s worst sink estates’ transmute my rainy January Sunday a few weeks ago, and immediately there exists…

Letters on Legal Architecture

Correspondence between a lawyer and an architect on how, amongst other things, architecture embodies the law. FIRST LETTER (New York on July 12th 2012) /// Dear Lucy, I read your essay Archiving Burroughs: Interzone, Law, Self-Medication with attention and appreciated, as usual, the way you manage to link narrative, law and space all together. I do…

The Law of the Commons: Climate Change Protest in Buckfastleigh

The col­lect­ive aspir­a­tions of the people of Buck­fastleigh were pro­tec­ted and recog­nised in a famil­iar David and Goliath-​like battle. On Thursday 17 October the community of Buckfastleigh, South Devon, heard the fate of their town, their livelihoods, the protection of their immediate environment and surrounding ecosystems, presented to them in the much awaited decision of…

Squat or Rot? The Changing Architectures of Property, Land and Law Property Rights Workshop, Law School, Exeter 27 March 2013

If you see a house, take it and let the law do its damnedest. (Dworkin 1988, 13) This seminar has been put together at a timely juncture to interrogate the changing landscapes of property and law within legislation, within buildings, within history, within configurations of space and time, and to highlight the importance of questioning the…

No Home for Squatters’ Rights: Limitations and Legitimated Violence

As of 1 September 2012, under Section 144 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (“LASPOA”), it became illegal in England and Wales to squat a residential building. Despite the fact that displacing someone from a building that had obvious signs of being their home without the permission of the legal owner has been illegal since the Criminal Law Act 1977, the necessity for a duplicate law just goes to demonstrate the accelerated deification and reification of individual property rights, over the social utility and sharing of resources held within the philosophy and practice of squatting. This recent shift in media-aggravated legislative change is a definitive move further in favour of the landowner as opposed to those who have no land, and those who support the redistribution of land.

Some Indonesian Recollections on Critical Legal Pluralism

I recently returned from a three month fellowship in the kaleidoscopic nation that is Indonesia. I undertook research with non-governmental organisation ICRAF (World Agroforestry Centre), analysing their ‘rewards’ (Payments for Environmental Services or ‘PES’) schemes for the farmers for planting trees in order to sequest carbon, and my field work was based in Paninggahan, West…

Trespassers Will and the Removal of the Other

  It seems as though a unique space within UK law is soon to be removed, or at least being discussed as so. Whilst the recent bout of occupations, and the display of revolt against the violent education cuts, reached their climax, I was away in another country. I read that the rights to squat…

Poems, Kettles and Monopolies

A short poem inspired by the student protests, mainly on the ‘kettling of kettling’ idea used by friends and supporters of injured protestor Alfie Meadows.  They created something of a ‘Russian doll’ effect by surrounding the police at their headquarters at Scotland Yard.  Also some underlying thoughts on the state’s monopoly of violence. Dolly Caught in a series of monologues, an…