Tag: International Law

Interruption: Five Artefacts of International Law (Part II)

ANZAC in Egypt: Myths, Memories and Movement in the Monumental Imagining of the First World War Charlotte Peevers* The original Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (‘ANZAC’) Memorial at Port Said, Egypt (destroyed during the Suez Crisis of 1956 and replicated in Albany, WA in 1964 and at ANZAC Parade in Canberra in 1968) embodies…

The First World War Interrupted: Artefacts as International Law’s Archive (Part I)

Separated from us by the barrier of a century. Inaugurator of a fully mechanised modernity. Eye-opener for the birth of a new, horrified, global society. Premonition of a future to come. This is the Great War. As one supremely tragic bookend to the ‘long’ nineteenth century, the ‘Great War’ is offered to international lawyers as a…

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and its comrades, the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) demonstrate an unwillingness amongst the traditional economic powers to deal with both emergent economic powers and the Global South on an equal basis within the fora already established for such purposes. An oft…

The TTIP: Back to the future?

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a stark example of how the proliferation of international economic law during the past three decades is an essential part of the neoliberal agenda and therefore ‘part of the problem’.In 1954 the ordo-liberal economist1 W. Roepke was invited in the Hague to deliver a paper on the…

Three Questions for Hamas

There is no doubt that Hamas has exhibited extraordinary resilience under the most difficult of conditions that have bedeviled its period of political leadership in the Gaza Strip that started in 2007. It also seems clear as persuasively argued by Sandy Tolan in a valuable Common Dreams article [Tolan, “Blown Chances in Gaza: Israel &…

International Law 1914/2014

Given the growing memorialisation of the beginning of the First World War, Prof. Fleur Johns charts a number of the continuities and ruptures between our understanding then and now of International Law and the international environment.Looking back to mid-1914 from mid-2014, it is hard to see beyond the piles of bodies. History barely seems up…

Civilians, Combatants, and Histories of International Law

In Gaza and elsewhere, those who politically support anti-​occupation politics are easily cast as un-​civilian.In the media coverage of war, whether reports on individual incidents or the numbing tallies of casualties, the distinction between civilians and combatants is central and frequently contested. The killing of the four boys who had been playing soccer on a…

ELDH Statement on Syria: An alleged crime against humanity should not be punishable by an illegal use of force

The European Lawyers for Democracy and Human Rights statement on Syria, London/ Düsseldorf, 30 August 2013 The European Lawyers for Democracy and Human Rights (ELDH), with members in 18 European countries, is absolutely opposed to the proposed use of illegal force by Western powers against the Syrian regime. The US government is leading a call…

What is radical in ‘radical international law’?

Robert O’Brien and Asia Art Archive

This article started life as a response to the call for papers for the international Workshop ‘Towards a Radical International Law’, held at the London School of Economics in April 2011. The call for papers started with a bold declaration: International law is a prominent site for the investiture of hope in the face of…