Tag: Luce Irigaray

Space: Notes on the Thought of Luce Irigaray

Key Concept   In March 2015, a conference was held in New York entitled Feminism in Architecture 2015, and subtitled, ‘We need to change our expectations. We need new models of success. We need to change what and how we teach’. I made an application, and I suggested adding to the subtitle ‘And we need…

Teaching: Notes on the Thought of Luce Irigaray

Key Concept One of the major concerns for Irigaray regarding education, and in my view perhaps the most important one, involves the absence of horizontal relations in the classroom. Indeed, Irigaray writes: Education is still based on the characteristics of the male subject, and seldom takes interest in the values of the female subject. Subject-object…

Language: Notes on the Thought of Luce Irigaray

Key ConceptLuce Irigaray’s critique of masculine language systems follows logically from her broader critique of history and culture first elaborated 40 years ago in Speculum.1 Irigaray’s thinking on language is so complex and informed by so many difficult methodological frameworks, when approaching it for the first time I think it helps to look at her corpus…

Touch: Notes on the Thought of Luce Irigaray

Key ConceptTouch is at the heart of Luce Irigaray’s dialectic of relations with the other. It is a gesture that responds to the call of the (m)other.1 The dialectic of touch is based upon the gesture of respect and reverence towards the source or the gesture of violence if it seeks to appropriate the subjectivity…

Masculine Subjects: Notes on the Thought of Luce Irigaray

Key Concept Given that Irigaray’s philosophical project focuses at large on rethinking the relationships between women and men, within a culture of sexual difference, as subjects in their own terms, it seems therefore only logical that sexual difference (in Irigaray’s later texts reworked as sexuate difference) reveal itself as a fruitful framework for also engaging…

Equality: Notes on the Thought of Luce Irigaray

Key ConceptEquality is a concept that has concerned Luce Irigaray, in various guises, throughout her work. In this post I will discuss both her critique of liberal mobilisations of equality, and her rethinking of equality through sexual difference. Irigaray’s work is often divided into three phases.1 Briefly, in the first phase, or the ‘critical’ phase,…